Squash

Squash

with No Comments

Squash is a very old food crop with evidence of its cultivation going back at least 8,000 B.C in Central America. Squash comes from the Narragansett Indian word “askutasquash.” which roughly translates into “eaten raw or uncooked”. In addition to its food value, many squashes were grown to be used as containers when dried (mostly the gourd type).

Squash plant
Virtually, the entire squash plant is edible. The leaves, tendrils, shoots, stems, flowers, seeds, and fruit can be eaten. Squash seeds can be eaten directly, ground into paste or (particularly for pumpkins), pressed for vegetable oil. The shoots, leaves, and tendrils can be eaten as greens and the blossoms are an important part of Native American cooking.
There are two types of Squashes; “Summer” squashes that are fast maturing (fruit in ~50 days), have thin rinds that are usually eaten, cannot be stored for long periods (two weeks at best), and are generally picked when immature. Our courgettes are in this group. “Winter” squash types are take longer to mature (~100 days to maturity) have thick rinds that generally need to be peeled, are picked when wintersquashcompletely mature and can be stored for several months. Winter squash develops more beta carotene after being stored than it has immediately after picking and the smallest squash are usually the tastiest.
Squashes are mostly water, and are low in calories, fat and sodium. They are a great source of beta carotene, one of the best antioxidants and have lots of fibre and potassium.
The varieties we offer are; Spaghetti, small Butternut, Uchiki-kuri, Buttercup, Sweet Delicate, and Jack O’Lantern Pumpkin. Check out our Winter Squash guide for tones of recipes and facts. Our suppliers for this amazing fruit (yup, as it contains seeds, it officially not a veg!), are Tolhurst Organics and North Aston Organics.